#CyberFLASH: CSE says Snowden leaks eroding spy agency’s long-term advantage over terrorists

snowden-onlinedatabase-20150304Canada’s electronic spy agency says leaks by former U.S. intelligence contractor Edward Snowden have “diminished the advantage” it enjoyed over terrorists and other targets, both in the short term and — of more concern — well into the future.

In newly released briefing notes, the Communications Security Establishment says Snowden’s disclosures about CSE’s intelligence capabilities and those of its allies “have a cumulative detrimental effect” on its operations.

The Ottawa-based CSE monitors foreign communications of intelligence interest to Canada, and exchanges a large amount of information with partner agencies in the United States, Britain, Australia and New Zealand.

The notes, obtained by The Canadian Press under the Access to Information Act, were among the briefing materials prepared for CSE chief Greta Bossenmaier’s March 25 appearance before the House of Commons committee on national defence.

Canada spying

Documents Snowden handed to the media revealed the U.S. National Security Agency — the CSE’s American counterpart — had quietly obtained access to a huge volume of emails, chat logs and other information from major Internet companies, as well as massive amounts of data about telephone calls.

The documents also suggest Canada helped the United States and Britain spy on participants at a London G20 summit and that the CSE devised a sophisticated spy operation against Brazil’s ministry of mines and energy.

Read more here

#CyberFLASH — Charges that Canada spied on Brazil unveil CSEC’s inner workings

wpid-PastedGraphic-2013-07-19-23-33.pngLeaked documents showing that Canada’s electronic intelligence-gathering agency targeted the Brazilian government threaten to disrupt relations between the countries – and thrust the secretive CSEC into the public spotlight.

On Sunday night, Brazil’s flagship Fantastico investigative program on the Globo television network revealed leaked documents suggesting that Communications Security Establishment Canada (CSEC) has spied on computers and smartphones affiliated with Brazil’s mining and energy ministry in a bid to gain economic intelligence.

The report, attributed to documents first obtained by the former U.S. government contractor Edward Snowden, includes frames of a CSEC-earmarked presentation that was apparently shared with the United States and other allies in June, 2012.

“Brazilian Ministry of Mines and Energy (MME),” a title page of the leaked case study reads. “New target to develop.”

The impact for Canada of these revelations could be equally grave: they come at a time when Brazil has become a top destination for Canadian exports, when a stream of delegations from the oil and gas industries are making pilgrimages to Rio de Janeiro to try to get a piece of the booming offshore oil industry, and when the Canadian government is eager to burnish ties with Brasilia. Foreign Affairs Minister John Baird visited Brazil in August, and spoke repeatedly about the country as a critical partner for Canadian business.

Read more on theglobeandmail

Five Eyes spying alliance will survive Snowden

wpid-PastedGraphic-2013-07-19-23-33.png
Britain needed US intelligence to help thwart a major terror attack. New Zealand relied on it to send troops to Afghanistan. And Australia used it to help convict a would-be bomber.

All feats were the result of a spying alliance known as Five Eyes that groups together five English-speaking democracies, and they point to a vital lesson: American information is so valuable, experts say, that no amount of global outrage over secret US surveillance powers would cause Britain, Canada, Australia and New Zealand to ditch the Five Eyes relationship.

The broader message is that the revelations from NSA leaker Edward Snowden are unlikely to stop or even slow the global growth of secret-hunting – an increasingly critical factor in the security and prosperity of nations.

Information is like gold,” said Bruce Ferguson, the former head of New Zealand’s foreign spy agency, the Government Communications Security Bureau. “If you don’t have it, you don’t survive.

Read more here

© 2013 CyberTRAX Canada - All Rights Reserved.
Sponsored by C3SA Corp.