#CyberFLASH: The Deep, Dark Web Is Getting Some Company Soon — From Canadian Cops

editor-picks-top-10-secret-resources-hiding-tor-network.w654Canada’s federal police service is investing in software that, it hopes, will let it shed light onto the darkest regions of the deep internet.

The money, part of a wide-reaching program aimed at defense and security research, will be spent developing software to trace and monitor supposedly nefarious activity on the darknet — a series of encrypted sites that advertise everything from human trafficking to hitmen.

The Canadian Safety and Security Program (CSSP) is a funding regime that provides resources to various public safety, policing, and military programs run in conjunction with government departments. Previous rounds of funding have contributed to products that can track explosives, equipment that can detect drugs from their vapors, and training to protect Canada’s energy infrastructure from cyber attacks.

The most recent cash infusion, worth some $12 million for 24 projects, focuses on everything from efforts to combat radicalization in Muslim communities, to defusing improvised explosive devices (IEDs), and technology targeting drones.

Perhaps the most politically-charged and potentially controversial project is run by the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and two technology firms.

The RCMP, the government stated, “will lead a project to develop and implement a web-crawler to explore anonymous and dark regions of the internet and identify content of interest to national security and law enforcement communities.”

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#CyberFLASH: Ottawa must do more to fight cyber attacks in light of latest hack

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Hacktivist group “Anonymous” has struck again in this country, leaking what the group says is a classified document from Canada’s spy agency CSIS.

The document is dated February of last year and reveals CSIS was trying to extend its secure network to twenty-five foreign stations.

The leaked document also reveals 70 CSIS operatives work at the stations, processing 22 500 messages a year.

A spokesperson with the government wouldn’t confirm the the legitimacy of the document.

“We do not comment on leaked documents and we continue to monitor this situation closely,” Jeremy Laurin said in an email.

Liberal MP Marc Garneau says the leak is troubling.

“I was very concerned when I found out that all of this information had been obtained by the group Anonymous,” Garneau said. “This is a very serious wake up call for the government, cyber security is a reality that we must address today.”

This latest hack is the latest in a long string. Last month, CSIS and the Government of Canada’s websites were victims of a cyber attack, and before that websites for the National Research Council and Revenue Canada were hacked.

Just last week, Public Safety Minister Steven Blaney announced 142 million dollars in funding for cyber security over the next five years, which is in addition to 94.4 million dollars allotted in the budget.

Garneau doesn’t think it’s enough.

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#CyberFLASH: Anonymous CSIS document leak probed by RCMP, CSE

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RCMP and Canada’s electronic spy agency are investigating the leak of a secret government document dealing with CSIS, Canada’s main spy agency, CBC News has confirmed.

Cybercrime investigators with the Communications Security Establishment (CSE) are looking into how the online international activist group Anonymous obtained the classified document and then leaked it to the media.

The probe comes after the National Post on Tuesday published a Treasury Board document supplied by Anonymous that reveals CSIS operates 25 foreign stations around the globe.

Investigators are also trying to track down the people responsible to determine whether they violated Canada’s Security of Information Act.
Etienne Rainville, a spokesman for the public safety minister, said little about the apparent breach or the document’s authenticity.

“We do not comment on leaked documents and we continue to monitor this situation closely,” he said in an email.

Anonymous demands action

In an accompanying video, Anonymous is threatening to release more sensitive government documents unless police in British Columbia do more to investigate the fatal RCMP shooting of Anonymous activist James McIntyre earlier this month in Dawson Creek.

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#CyberFLASH: Government reacts cautiously to possible classified document breach

images-115OTTAWA — The federal government is saying little about an apparent breach involving classified information.

Digital hacking collective Anonymous made good late Monday on a threat to release what it says is the first of many secret documents.

An apparent Treasury Board memo about funding of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service’s overseas communications capabilities was posted online.

The Canadian Press could not confirm the document’s authenticity and Jeremy Laurin, a spokesman for Public Safety Minister Steven Blaney, had no immediate comment.

Earlier Monday, Laurin said officials were closely monitoring the situation.

In an accompanying video statement, Anonymous denounced the recent shooting of an Anonymous supporter in British Columbia during a confrontation with the RCMP.

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#CyberFLASH: RCMP offline as deadline looms for ‘Anonymous’ leak threat

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The national RCMP website is offline and has been since the early morning, seemingly part of a larger cyber attack by the hacker group Anonymous, who have given an impossible deadline to the police to arrest a particular Mountie by the end of the day or watch as high-level documents are leaked.

Hackers with Anonymous claim to have repeatedly hacked supposedly impenetrable government servers over several months and vowed last week that they would leak the classified national security documents in retaliation for the fatal shooting of James McIntyre in Dawson Creek, B.C., earlier this month, unless the officer responsible is arrested.

The 48-year-old McIntyre, who was shot outside a BC Hydro public meeting in Dawson Creek last Thursday, reportedly died wearing a Guy Fawkes mask and wielding a knife. Others claiming to be Anonymous members say McIntyre was a First Nations Anonymous member who, using the Twitter handle @jaymack9, helped organize opposition to the Site C Dam in northeastern B.C.

The RCMP has been given until today at 5 p.m. Pacific time to either arrest the officer or watch as Anonymous release the documents. The government has confirmed it is aware of the threat, which was posted repeatedly on social media.

The breaches happened in stages over several months, an Anonymous spokesperson told The National Post.

The RCMP has yet to comment on the website going offline early Monday and whether it’s due to maintenance or the result of an attack.

If what Anonymous is claiming is true, statements from the government that the low-level cyber attacks had no impact would be false and instead suggest the hacks may have gone undetected and deeper than the agencies were aware.

The hacktivists said the document dump was originally planned for September but was moved up because of the Dawson Creek shooting.

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#CyberFLASH: Anonymous says it hacked Canada’s security secrets in retaliation for police shooting of B.C. activist

 

anonymous-1Hackers with Anonymous say they breached supposedly secure Canadian government computers and accessed high-level, classified national security documents as retaliation for last week’s fatal shooting by the RCMP of a protester in British Columbia.

To support their claim, members of Anonymous provided the National Post with a document that appears to be legitimate Treasury Board of Canada notes on federal cabinet funding to fix flaws in the foreign stations of the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS).

The Post has not independently been able to verify the authenticity of the document, marked with a security classification of “Secret.”

Anonymous activists say they will disseminate sensitive documents if the officer who shot James McIntyre in Dawson Creek, B.C., is not arrested by Monday at 5 p.m., Pacific time. That threat has also been made on social media and a government source confirms authorities are aware of the threat.

Activists say McIntyre was a member of Anonymous. When he was shot he appeared to be wearing a Guy Fawkes mask, often worn by supporters of the global hacktivist collective.

Anonymous says it has several secret files.

“We do have other documents and files. We are not going to speak to quantity, date of their release, manner of their release, or their topic matter at this time,” a spokesperson for a coterie of Anonymous told the Post in an interview conducted through encrypted communications.

“This will be an ongoing operation with expected surprise as a critical element.”

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#CyberFLASH: Mounties to benefit from latest round of federal cybersecurity funding

images-122OTTAWA – An RCMP investigative team to combat high-priority cybercrime is among the initiatives that will benefit from more than $142 million in federal cybersecurity spending.

Public Safety Canada says the Mounties’ ability to detect and fight online crime will also get a boost through better training, technical support and intelligence capacity.

In addition, the department says the new money will go towards securing essential computer systems outside of the government.

The federally run Canadian Cyber Incident Response Centre will develop real-time automated feeds, providing the private sector with additional — and more prompt — threat information.

The latest money is in addition to more than $94 million in cybersecurity funding announced in the April federal budget.

It comes as the government grapples with denial-of-service attacks that have taken the websites of several federal agencies temporarily offline.

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#CyberFLASH: C-51 sees charter challenge from civil liberties, press freedom advocates

Bill C51 Protest 20150314Two groups say they plan to launch a charter challenge today against sections of the controversial Anti-Terrorism Act, also known as Bill C-51.

In a joint statement, both the Canadian Civil Liberties Association and Canadian Journalists for Free Expression say sections of Bill C-51 violate the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms “in a manner that is not justified in a free and democratic society.”

Bill C-51 gives the Canadian Security Intelligence Service more power to thwart suspected terrorist plots — not just gather information about them.

It also increases the exchange of federal security information, broadens no-fly list powers and creates a new criminal offence of encouraging someone to carry out a terrorist attack.

The bill also makes it easier for the RCMP to obtain a peace bond to restrict the movements of suspects and extend the amount of time they can be kept in preventative detention.

The challenge will be filed with the Ontario Superior Court.

“Bill C-51 is a grave threat to our rights in Canada. It will lead to censorship and a massive chill on free expression, and enables a potentially widespread abuse of power,” said CJFE executive director Tom Henheffer in a news release.

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