#CyberFLASH: Security predictions 2016: More ransomware, tougher cyber insurance

image-2Twelve months ago when I became ITWorldCanada.com’s contributing writer on cybersecurity the state of things was pretty bleak: 2014 marked another record year of data breaches, there was no miracle technology that would seal the cracks in an enterprise and every expert was predicting attackers would find new ways to get around defences.

As I look ahead to 2016 every expert I talk to says attacks will continue to find new ways of getting around defences, there’s no miracle technology coming that will seal the cracks in an enterprise and it will probably be another record year of data breaches.

In the face of that what’s a CISO to do?

For one thing, continue sealing the cracks in the enterprise the old-fashioned way: Security awareness training, using two-factor authentication wherever possible, network segmentation, limiting the number of people with administration privileges and access to sensitive data, patching, increase spending on intrusion detection and prevention (including analytics), be part of a threat intelligence (either formally by buying a service, or informally with colleagues) and solid backup and restore. On top of that, have a tested disaster recovery plan.

In addition, be aware of certain trends experts say will mark 2016 as different from the year before. Here’s some of them:

–The evolution of technology means IT departments more than ever have to understand what business units want, and then propose secure ways of doing it, says Bob Hansmann, director of security analysis and strategy Ratheon Websense security labs.

Read more here

#CyberFLASH: IoT holds great promise for cities, but don’t spy on people

IMG_0397-e1449500476571-620x250Today’s urban centres face myriad problems; strained and dated infrastructure (roads, sewers, and transportation, electrical and communication systems) are further taxed by the escalating demands placed upon them by ever-increasing populations. While cities are looking to deliver more services and new, better infrastructure, they are constrained by limited funding and dealing with citizens who “want what they want, and they want it now.”

That’s according to Kathryn Willson, program director of Microsoft CityNext. Speaking at Technicity, an event co-hosted by IT World Canada and the City of Toronto last week, Willson provided concrete examples of how the Internet of Things has been put to use in cities around the globe – reducing dependencies on resources, creating efficiencies, and saving costs. IoT is providing viable, sustainable solutions that will help municipalities meet the needs of its citizens – and save the environment, she told the audience.

Take for example the city of Helsinki, Finland, which reduced the fuel consumption of its bus network. While GPS devices were already in use and the city had a good handle on where buses were, city officials sought to answer the question of ‘how’ buses were moving, looking specifically for areas of high-fuel consumption. Additional sensors were added to the accelerators, brakes and inside the engine compartment to measure temperature. Two actionable items were identified from the data, the first being a driver-training program. The second item related to construction of roads. The outcome: Helsinki reduced fuel consumption of its bus fleet by five per cent – saving millions of Euros as a result, she said.

Then there’s Paris, which has an electric-car-sharing program with 4,300 charging stations and 2,300 vehicles. People in the community subscribe to this service. The city’s goal is to have 25,000 gasoline cars off the road by 2023, reducing carbon emissions by 75,0000 metric tons. In addition, with improved customer satisfaction and fewer cars on the road, this new optional mode of transportation is benefitting citizens as owning a car in Paris costs about 5,000 Euros a year, while this program costs about 900 Euros.

Read more here

© 2013 CyberTRAX Canada - All Rights Reserved.
Sponsored by C3SA Corp.