#CyberFLASH: Canada’s ICT industry says no to more police powers to access subscriber data

computer-gimbalThe information and telecommunications industry has lined up almost solidly against suggestions police should have access without a warrant to basic subscriber information they hold.

That’s the take-away from a number of industry association and service provider briefs filed last week as submissions closed for Public Safety Canada’s search for citizen and private sector opinions for a new national security framework.

Public Safety Canada issued a green paper for discussion last September calling for opinions on potentially changing federal laws and policies on several issues including loosening police and intelligence agency access to basic subscriber information, forcing communications service providers to hold for a set period of time to subscribers’ metadata, forcing for all communications service providers to buy communications interception equipment police can use, and making developers of encryption solutions to build in backdoors so law enforcement can unscramble protected documents.

In a word, the answer to all from the industry was “no.”

On warrantless access to basic subscriber information

–Information and telecommunications Association of Canada (ITAC), which lobbies for most of the country’s ITC firms including Bell Canada, Rogers Communications, Telus, IBM, HP-Enterprise and others, said in its submission that improving and standardizing paperwork would speed up police access. It also called for “clear rules designed to avoid police “fishing expeditions” that could contravene judicial requirements and privacy laws.”

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