#CyberFLASH: Canadians aren’t up for mass surveillance

mobile-securityWhen Ralph Goodale and David McGuinty headed to the UK and France last January to get ideas about overseeing national security issues in Canada, it seemed like an intelligent thing to do.

But did our public safety minister and his MP colleague go to the wrong place?

The Liberals, after all, are trying to amend Bill C-51, a controversial piece of anti-terrorism legislation that Canadians don’t like. No wonder. What’s to like about a government—sanctioned police state law?

Under Harper-era legislation, the Canadian Security Intelligence Service (CSIS) was empowered to operate outside the Charter of Rights, which gave it authority to violate citizens’ constitutional rights. And Canada’s cyber intelligence agency, the Communications Security Establishment (CSE) was allowed to conduct mass collection of information on Canadians without a specific target.

Based on their attitudes towards mass surveillance, Britain and France are hardly the countries to help Canada rein in the excesses of Bill C-51.

According to a YouGov survey of 15,000 people reported this week by Amnesty International, citizens of Britain, France and the Philippines were most comfortable with government eavesdropping. Britain was one of three countries out of 13 surveyed where more people favoured surveillance of all people — British citizens, foreigners, and foreign countries, than favoured monitoring none of them.

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