#CyberFLASH: Balancing police, power and privacy

hacker-stolen-passwords

Canadians support more investigative powers for police — with a catch, Nov. 17

Your story declares that Canadians support police demands for more surveillance, even though data from the survey indicates only 34 per cent are confident that new powers will be used “reasonably and according to the law.” Presumably that is why, in every case, the survey found that people want use of these powers to require a warrant from a judge.

Yet while it mentions reports of police spying on journalists and lawbreaking by CSIS, both your story and the survey neglect to mention that warrants were granted inappropriately in the first case, and that CSIS lied to the courts about their actions in the second.

The survey also suggests Canadians support data retention by telecom providers if authorities have a warrant to access the data. However, it wasn’t asked whether they should be able to retain that data before a warrant is granted or only afterwards. Your story assumes, without any justification, that Canadians support retention of data about a person before a warrant is granted.

The report also states that 74 per cent of Canadians have never encrypted their communications, without pointing out that we do so every time we use online banking, or visit an increasing number of websites — including the Star’s! Worst of all, it leaves out that Canadians have a right not to incriminate themselves under the Charter, protecting them against giving their passwords or encryption keys in an investigation.

Finally, the survey suggests 47 per cent of Canadians think there is a right to “complete digital privacy,” while only 23 per cent think it is currently possible to have that privacy.

Read more here

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